7/24/14

Shakespeare Festival in Your Backyard: 5 Days of Shakespeare Fun at Home

Juggling.  
Merry playing on the fife.
Feasting on Turkey Legs.
Painting.
Jousting.
A Traveling Band of Actors.

Sounds like a far away time and place, not to be experienced by we mere modern dwellers, right?  Or, at least as close as the local Renaissance Fair? 
ORIGINAL PHOTO CREDIT via Compfight.com CC
What if you could create the fun and excitement of a Shakespeare Festival in your very own backyard?  Rising to this challenge may sound outlandish and far-fetched at first glance.  You may find, however, that your talented family is more creative and ready that you first realized.  Rather than breaking-the-bank to hire a world renown flame juggler, we can fall on the tried and true home educator methodology. DO. IT. YOURSELF.


ORIGINAL PHOTO CREDIT via Compfight.com CC

Here is a resource list of fun and engaging activities you can use to produce a Shakespeare Festival in Your Own Backyard:


  • Put on a little show.  Showcase your family's talent and what you have learned by staging a scene, or re-writing a scene, to perform for your guests.  Here is a great article from the Shakespeare Sleepover Society.
  • Have a multimedia experience.  Have audio Shakespeare playing in the background with this FREE Audio of Nesbit's Shakespeare.  You can also have this FREE Power Point, constructed by students, highlighting points of Shakespeare's life.
  • As your guest arrive, give them this PRINTABLE - What Do You Know About Shakespeare?  Then you and your family will be able to share more with your guests about what you have all learned together.
ORIGINAL PHOTO CREDIT

  • BUILD-A-SONNET!  Play a game of Sonnet Building.  Using the list below  of Shakespeare's most popular sonnets, cut each line individually, then laminate all the pieces.  Place each individual sonnet's pieces in a bowl and have your guest use them to build the sonnets.  Have the full sonnets printed too, so they can put them in the correct order.  Sonnet 18, Sonnet 121, Sonnet 116, Sonnet 118, Sonnet 122
  • Have an Art Show!  Load your table with completed SHAKESPEARE ART LESSONS that you have created together.  Set out colors, map pencils, pencils, and watercolors for your guest to use and create these quick projects to take home: Shakespeare Presents - create a stage scene, Draw William Shakespeare, Color this picture of Shakespeare.
  • LEGO UP!  Have some Lego Mini-Figures and scenery available to build some fun Shakespeare action during your festival.
  • Set up a Puppet Theater and use these Paper dolls (make them into puppets, by printing on card-stock & then attaching them to craft sticks)  from Romeo and Juliet, and Elizabethan men & Elizabethan women, to perform a short scene from a play.  Then leave extra copies out for your guests to make their own puppets.
Enjoy all the backyard revelry!  


If you missed our previous posts in this series, you can catch up now.  



Don't forget to keep hopping on with the iHomeschool Network Summer Hopscotch.

Come and Hopscotch along with the talented and creative home educators at the iHomeschool Network.


Joyfully Learning with You,

The Joyful Socks Mom 

Be sure to keep up with Joyful Socks on PinterestTwitterInstagram & Facebook

7/23/14

Art Lessons for Studying Shakespeare: 5 Days of Shakespeare Fun at Home

O! for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention." ~ William Shakespeare

Fueling a love for Shakespeare can be an intimidating process.  Perhaps this is another instance we might take Shakespeare's cue and reach for a "muse".  Art is a beautifully diverse muse, whose highways hold limitless discoveries and a muse for which the road seems ever paved with inspiration.  Let us utilize these roads to discover a greater appreciation for the Bard and his works.


ORIGINAL PHOTO CREDIT via Compfight.com CC
*NOTE FROM EDITOR* As with all articles posted, I attempt to keep resources family-friendly.  This is difficult, at times, with art.  I strongly suggest that you preview ALL LINKS before allowing your child to view them to insure that the art is aligned with your family's personal standards.  Thank you.

Art from the Shakespeare's Time: View and observe the art of the Elizabethan era.
Nicholas_Hilliard_017
ORIGINAL PHOTO SOURCE/CREDIT

Drawing Lessons for The Bard: Try your own hand at some Shakespeare-inspired drawing.
  • HOW TO DRAW THE GLOBE THEATER
The Globe Theater - This is a great article on the background of the Globe Theater to read before you begin.  Here is another page that compare the 1st Globe Theater to its now, modern day, recreation.  This is another excellent resource for the history (wild & woolly though it may be) of the Globe. And one last article here from No Sweat Shakespeare on The Globe.

Before beginning your drawing of the Globe Theatre, I suggest spending some time with this excellent coloring page.

There is a picture only tutorial video below, on how to draw this simple Globe Theatre drawing with your kids.  I hope you enjoy creating together.




If you missed our previous posts in this series, you can catch up now.  




Don't forget to keep hopping on with the iHomeschool Network Summer Hopscotch.

Come and Hopscotch along with the talented and creative home educators at the iHomeschool Network.


Joyfully Learning with You,

The Joyful Socks Mom 

Be sure to keep up with Joyful Socks on PinterestTwitterInstagram & Facebook

7/22/14

Action Packed Shakespeare: 5 Days of Shakespeare Fun at Home

ORIGINAL PHOTO CREDIT via Compfight.com CC
"Action is Eloquence" 
~ William Shakespeare
Good to know Mr. Shakespeare.  If this statement is true, then my old Webelos Den is truly the most eloquent group of boys in the world! Just saying.

The thrill of Shakespeare can be ignited in boys, especially, when we begin to examine the possibilities of sword fighting, ship wrecks, murder most foul, and high-end adventure.  Many of Shakespeare's plots include adventures and sporting of various kinds that can help inspire those of the male species that might otherwise be less inclined to tune-in to Shakespeare study.

Of course, it goes without saying that one should continue to keep the age and developmental stage of each child in mind, when selecting such action-packed works.

Let me first begin with a list of Shakespeare plays that may be of particular interest to the bored and restless, listed here with the themes that may be of interest to those who enjoy action.

Julius Caesar: war, Roman history, murder.

Romeo & Juliet: several fight scenes, accidental death, suicide.
Hamlet: murder, revenge, fighting.
Macbeth: war, murder, revenge.
As You Like It: contains a notable wrestling scene.
King Lear: war, betrayal. 

You can find the Complete Works of Shakespeare online here.

Action Packed Shakespeare, High-End Adventure & Super Villains: What stirs the blood of a young boy more than high-end adventure, soldiers in battle, bad guys and all-out war?  Not much else, I would gather according to current video games sales statistics.  Embrace this want for adventure and turn it into a tool for teaching Shakespeare.  

Sporting events of many various kinds can also be found inside the pages of the Bard's works.  Woven throughout many of Shakespeare's plays you will find sports of various kinds, including: sword fighting, quintain (a form of jousting), wrestling, running, racing, swimming for competition, and even billiards.  There is also bear-baiting, as was a source of entertainment & sport in Shakespeare's time, but we should certainly strike it off our list as a source of enrichment for homeschooling purposes.  People think homeschoolers are weird enough already.

Here, I have gathered a list of activities and resources that will serve to enrich the various adventure-filled Shakespeare plays with some hands-on action:

  • Make teeter-boards and sticks to practice jousting.  Here is a quick tutorial on making your own wobble board & here is a tutorial on making your own jousting sticks.
  • Begin a study of Shakespeare's greatest villains and analyze their character traits using this character analysis notebooking page.
  • Learn more about the sport of fencing & make your own swords to practice with.  Remember to go slow and following the rules of engagement.
  • Notebook about the sports and gaming enjoyed in Shakespeare's time. Here is an article about sports & also here is a great printable notebooking pages to document some of your findings.
  • Listen to Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Romeo & Juliet, As You Like It from Lamb's Shakespeare on Audio.  Now spend some time acting out the "action scenes" that most appeal to your child.  Practice and perform the scene after dinner.
Notebooking pages to accompany Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo & Juliet, King Lear and As You Like It can be found here, from Homeschool Share.

I hope you will join in tomorrow, as we will be completing an art lesson for studying Shakespeare.

If you missed our previous post, Day 1: Shalt Thou Go To Ye Olde' Cinema? check it out.

Don't forget to keep hopping on with the iHomeschool Network Summer Hopscotch.

Come and Hopscotch along with the talented and creative home educators at the iHomeschool Network.


Joyfully Learning with You,
The Joyful Socks Mom 

Be sure to keep up with Joyful Socks on PinterestTwitterInstagram & Facebook



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